Do you want to see meaningful information and images — that is, realistic and honest portrayals — of married partnerships, with discussion that encompasses both the successes and failures of couples who confront and seek to deal with marital challenges?

Don’t look for such things on Facebook.

That is the decided conclusion shared by several commentators weighing in on the role that Facebook plays in marriage portrayal and perceptions. Those persons voiced their thoughts on that topic in a recent New York Times article.

Here is a bottom-line point that is mutually agreed upon: Facebook is not the place to go to gain a balanced perspective on marriage in the United States.

It is, though, if — and as the Times notes — you’re more than happy with seeing a one-sided picture of marriage and its casting “in an exceptionally positive light.”

Reportedly, and notwithstanding that people most obligingly complain about many and diverse matters on their Facebook pages, they are generally loathe to grumble even remotely about their spouse or marital relationship.

Why is that?

Largely, because it’s personal. Your job, your pet, your car — all those things are external to you, which makes complaining about them a safe activity. They don’t personally demean or otherwise cast you in a negative light.

Your marriage, though, is different. It’s a partnership. You chose your spouse. You’re a team. Consequently, many people who think about chronicling marital woes and discord fear to do so out of a concern that any marital fissures they describe will be perceived by others as a personal failure.

“There is a fairy-tale marketing of marriage that we all participate in,” says one commentator quoted by the Times.

To the degree that’s true, Facebook consumers might want to search elsewhere for truly unbiased and accurate information about marriage and divorce in America.