What does the future hold? No one can say for sure. That does not mean we don’t have visions about what we want the future to look like. The focus for parents in Arkansas most certainly includes a hope that their children’s tomorrows will be better than whatever their situation might be today.

Even if the parents divorce or never marry, social scientists widely agree that the children are bound to fare better if both parents remain as active in their lives as is possible. Family law courts tend to talk the talk when it comes to balancing child custody and visitation issues to avoid perceptions of parental alienation. They don’t always walk the walk, however, and too often fathers wind up suffering for it.

This isn’t for lack of dads being vocal about protecting their rights and expressing their feelings. Earlier this summer, ahead of Father’s Day, NBC’s TODAY.com reported on an unscientific survey of fathers that found that a majority feel society generally doesn’t give dad’s the respect they are due as parents. Perhaps one of the biggest sore spots revealed by the poll is that most fathers consider it condescending when others describe the time they spend with their children as “babysitting.” They are parenting.

And more recently in London, protesters declared their objections to the state of father’s rights in the United Kingdom from the roof of St. Paul’s Cathedral. Talk about your bully pulpits. The protesters unfurled a massive banner and rappelled from the dome of the landmark church, decrying how British family courts spark parental alienation to the detriment of some 200 children every day.

Speaking out in protection of parental rights begins by becoming educated about the law. And the best way to do that and to lay the plans for the brightest future possible for parents and children of divorce is by speaking with skilled legal counsel as early as possible.