Most people in Arkansas and elsewhere would certainly agree that there is a clear demarcation between public and private life, and that certain elements of the latter should be beyond the purview of widespread scrutiny of strangers and a massive audience.

American law solidly recognizes that notion as well, and has long provided that when invasion of privacy crosses a certain threshold, with requisite elements surrounding bad intent on the part of a third party being sufficiently proven, criminal and civil penalties should be available as corresponding remedies.

Life in contemporary America has underscored that in an interesting way in recent years, with the instantly global audience engendered by various online Internet platforms (read social media; think perhaps Facebook, Instagram and Twitter) rendering invasion of privacy something entirely distinct from what it was in bygone decades, at least in terms of immediacy and dimensions.

Consider the recently reported matter involving pseudo-celebrity and reality-show mainstay Rob Kardashian and his former partner, television entertainer Black Chyna.

In the wake of the couple’s split, Kardashian posted various nude images of Chyna on social sites, accompanied by some harsh words.

Those images have subsequently been deleted, but debate certainly remains concerning whether Kardashian posted them vindictively and with the purpose of hurting Chyna, and whether she has suffered emotional distress from public viewing of photos she thought would always remain confidential.

Those questions go to the heart of elements that centrally factor into the crime of what is commonly called revenge porn, which is a modern-day and high-profile variant of the classical invasion-of-privacy tort.

Is Kardashian liable as either a defendant in a criminal case or respondent in a civil lawsuit?

Time will of course tell, and perhaps rather quickly, in the event that Chyna opts to take legal action in response to Kardashian’s behavior.

We will be sure to pass along any material or broadly notable details that surface in this privacy-related story.